Mark Twain Quotes

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1835-1910) was an American humorist and author. “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” is one of his famous novels.

Before he became a writer, Twain worked as a printer. He became very popular after publishing “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” a short humorous story.  He was also very successful as a public speaker. Twain was a good friend to many influential people of his time (artists, presidents, European royalty and industrialists).

Mark Twain Quotes

The only difference between a tax man and a taxidermist is that the taxidermist leaves the skin.

— Mark Twain

Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.

— Mark Twain

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you; that is the principal difference between a dog and a man.

— Mark Twain

My body is my own, at least I have always so regarded it. If I do harm … it is I who suffers, not the state.

— Mark Twain

Loyalty to petrified opinions never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world – and never will.

— Mark Twain

If you tell the truth you don’t have to remember anything.

— Mark Twain

It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.

— Mark Twain

There is no distinctly native American criminal class – save Congress.

— Mark Twain

That’s the difference between governments and individuals. Governments don’t care, individuals do.

— Mark Twain

In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, brave, hated, and scorned. When his cause succeeds however, the timid join him, for then it cost nothing to be a patriot.

— Mark Twain, Notebook, 1904

All you need in this life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure.

— Mark Twain, Notebook, 1887

Each of you, for himself, by himself and on his own responsibility, must speak.

— Mark Twain

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the things you did.

— Mark Twain

My kind of loyalty was to one’s country, not to its institutions or its officeholders. The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out, become ragged, cease to be comfortable, cease to protect the body from winter, disease, and death.

— Mark Twain

Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.

— Mark Twain, A.B. Paine’s Mark Twain: A Biography (Harper, 1912, Vol. 2, page 724).