John Locke Quotes

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

— John Locke

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any reason but because they are not already common.

— John Locke, Essay concerning Human Understanding, 1690

The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom.

— John Locke

Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.

— John Locke

Any single man must judge for himself whether circumstances warrant obedience or resistance to the commands of the civil magistrate; we are all qualified, entitled, and morally obliged to evaluate the conduct of our rulers. This political judgment, moreover, is not simply or primarily a right, but like self-preservation, a duty to God. As such it is a judgment that men cannot part with according to the God of Nature. It is the first and foremost of our inalienable rights without which we can preserve no other.

— John Locke

Where there is no law, there is no freedom.

— John Locke

Being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.

— John Locke, Second Treatise on Government

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

— John Locke, 1693

Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has a right to, but himself.

— John Locke, Second Treatise on Government

Government has no other end, but the preservation of property.

— John Locke

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

— John Locke