Frederic Bastiat Quotes

Claude Frédéric Bastiat (1801 –1850) was a French political economist and classical liberal theorist. His “opportunity cost” concept is one of his most important achievements.

Bastiat was 17 when he left school and went to work in the family export business. That job allowed him to see how markets can be affected by regulations, which was crucial to his later work. Bastiat was politically active, especially after 1830. He was elected to the Council General in 1832 and National Legislative Assembly after the Revolution of 1848.

Frederic Bastiat Quotes

But how is this legal plunder to be identified? Quite simply. See if the law takes from some persons what belongs to them, and gives it to other persons to whom it does not belong. See if the law benefits one citizen at the expense of another by doing what the citizen himself cannot do without committing a crime.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

Sometimes the law defends plunder and participates in it. Sometimes the law places the whole apparatus of judges, police, prisons and gendarmes at the service of the plunderers, and treats the victim — when he defends himself — as a criminal.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves in the course of time a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it.

— Frederic Bastiat, Economic Sophisms

It is impossible to introduce into society a greater change and a greater evil than this: the conversion of the law into an instrument of plunder.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

Life, faculties, production — in other words, individuality, liberty, property — this is man. And in spite of the cunning of artful political leaders, these three gifts from God precede all human legislation, and are superior to it. Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws. On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

In war, the stronger overcomes the weaker. In business, the stronger imparts strength to the weaker.

— Frederic Bastiat

It seems to me that this is theoretically right, for whatever the question under discussion—whether religious, philosophical, political, or economic; whether it concerns prosperity, morality, equality, right, justice, progress, responsibility, cooperation, property, labor, trade, capital, wages, taxes, population, finance, or government—at whatever point on the scientific horizon I begin my researches, I invariably reach this one conclusion: The solution to the problems of human relationships is to be found in liberty.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

Try to imagine a regulation of labor imposed by force that is not a violation of liberty; a transfer of wealth imposed by force that is not a violation of property. If you cannot reconcile these contradictions, then you must conclude that the law cannot organize labor and industry without organizing injustice.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended.

— Frederic Bastiat

By virtue of exchange, one man’s prosperity is beneficial to all others.

— Frederic Bastiat, Economic Harmonies

If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

Socialism, like the ancient ideas from which it springs, confuses the distinction between government and society. As a result of this, every time we object to a thing being done by government, the socialists conclude that we object to its being done at all. We disapprove of state education. Then the socialists say that we are opposed to any education. We object to a state religion. Then the socialists say that we want no religion at all. We object to a state-enforced equality. Then they say that we are against equality. And so on, and so on. It is as if the socialists were to accuse us of not wanting persons to eat because we do not want the state to raise grain.

— Frederic Bastiat, The Law

When under the pretext of fraternity, the legal code imposes mutual sacrifices on the citizens, human nature is not thereby abrogated. Everyone will then direct his efforts toward contributing little to, and taking much from, the common fund of sacrifices. Now, is it the most unfortunate who gains from this struggle? Certainly not, but rather the most influential and calculating.

— Frederic Bastiat, Justice and Fraternity

Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.

— Frederic Bastiat, Selected Essays on Political Economy